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Have you ever wondered if surrounding your adoptive or foster child with affection and compassion may not be preparing them for adulthood and the harsh realities of the “real world”? Dr. Karyn Purvis dispels this myth as part of her video series “10 Common Questions Adoptive Parents Ask.”

Building connection with your child is excellent preparation for the real world. Nuture when in balance with structure gives your child the tools and self-confidence needed to tackle the tough challenges of life in the future. Meeting the deep needs of your adoptive child, building solid relationships filled with trust and respect, and teaching loving limits allows them to develop secure attachments that are the solid basis for their future. As they mature, this basis teaches them to seek healthy relationships and apply healthy limits within their adult lives. For children from hard places, being nurturing is not permissiveness – it allows for the healing of old wounds and preparation for life.

To hear the entire series from Dr. Purvis visit http://empoweredtoconnect.org/topics/10-common-questions/ or explore more of Dr. Purvis’s resources for adoptive and foster parents at http://empoweredtoconnect.org.

If you are interested in connecting with other adoptive parents and learning more about adoption support at Saddleback Church, email orphans@saddleback.com or call 949-609-8555.

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The Children in Families First Act (CHIFF), a landmark piece of legislation that would prioritize family as a key element of U.S. foreign policy, was introduced to the House of Representatives on Wednesday by Representatives Kay Granger (R-TX) and Karen Bass (D-CA) along with 20 original co-sponsors from both parties.

CHIFF will work to coordinate government foreign assistance efforts so that emphasis and priority is placed on helping children remain, reunite with or regain a family. It will achieve this by redirecting and streamlining funds that are already spent to assist children living abroad and establishing a bureau in the Department of State to become a much-needed diplomatic hub for international child welfare. By bringing the need for effective and accountable child welfare systems to the forefront, CHIFF will also promote a holistic and preventative approach to strengthening child protections.

In addition, if passed CHIFF will strengthen the mechanisms for intercountry adoption by consolidating and placing these functions under the direction of the United States Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS).  CHIFF also transfers the accreditation of adoption service provider accreditation from the Department of State to USCIS.

This is an important time in the life of this legislation, and your voice can make a difference! Surveys show that only 20 calls from constituents are needed for a bill to the get the attention of our elected officials – click here to find information for your Representatives, as well as a script you can use on the phone to ask them to support CHIFF: http://bit.ly/17jO0OL

You can also show your support by liking CHIFF on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/childreninfamiliesfirst

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Orphan Sunday (November 3) is just two weeks away. This event is an opportunity for churches all over the world to unite in declaring God’s heart for vulnerable children and his plan for the Church to care for children without families. We hope that you will join Saddleback in participating in Orphan Sunday weekend, as we affirm that every child deserves a family!

As preparation for Orphan Sunday, we also invite you to watch a challenging message by Pastor Rick Warren, sharing God’s heart and plan to care for orphans around the world:

HFO Institute: Rick Warren on the Church and Orphan Care from Hope for Orphans on Vimeo.

To learn more about how you can serve the orphan in your community and abroad, come talk to us at the Orphan Care booth on the patio at any of the Lake Forest services on Orphan Sunday weekend November 2-3, or email orphans@saddleback.com.

 

Orphan Care PEACE teams travel to Rwanda to work with the local church to train social workers, teach churches about orphan care, and visit the homes of families who have adopted.

Here one team member, Tim, shares his experience on an orphan care PEACE trip this summer when he visited the home of a man who has adopted and is receiving support from the Rwanda Orphan Care Sponsorship program:

The moment I entered Anatas’ home, I couldn’t help but notice the desperate circumstances in which this man lived. The damp, dirt floors were only barely visible from a single light bulb haphazardly hanging from the ceiling. The rugged adobe bricks that served as the walls of the home looked severely weathered. There was a single wooden bench and a couple foldable plastic chairs surrounding a table in the middle of the living room. We sat down and politely introduced ourselves. This was my first home visit in Rwanda and had no idea what I was in for. 

Anatas was a tall and slender man who looked to be in his mid-to late 40’s. He appeared to be very timid when he first introduced himself. His daughter Martha was sheepishly sitting beside him, occasionally whispering something in Kinyarwanda in to his ear. As he continued to share his story, his initial mild manner turned to excitement and joy. He couldn’t help but smile at the way he described how God had radically changed his life. I was moved by his testimony of perseverance and resilience.  After the genocide that decimated his home, he remained a soldier to provide for his family. He witnessed the brutal deaths of people close to him and questioned his own survival.  He said he later examined his purpose and place in the world. In his heart, there was an emptiness that he was longing to fill. Soon after, Anatas went to check out a Christian church with his wife.  Since then, he has been attending church regularly and is a living testament to the blessings the Lord has given him. Now as a leader in his church, Anatas uses his story to bring others to Christ.

At the center of every man’s success is a woman.  In this case it is Valencia, his wife of 20 years. Together they have raised 6 beautiful children, 5 of whom are their biological children. His eldest daughter, Ruth, is his niece and was taken in after her parents tragically lost their lives during the conflict. Though their family, like many others, has been through tremendous suffering, their faith continues to thrive. Anatas has a deep relationship with Christ. He shared with me that his biggest hope is that his kids will grow a strong relationship with Christ as well.

Just as soon as I thought I had figured him out, he revealed a startling revelation. He is infected with HIV. His struggle to afford the HIV medications only exacerbates his struggle to supply food for his family.  His job as a construction worker yields a meager pay. He tells me that the Orphan Care Sponsorship funds that he receives through the local church for taking in an orphan are critical in providing for his family. Although he appears to be in desperate circumstances, this does not impede him from being a guiding example for others.  He works with a ministry in his church that gives tests and provides treatment for others with HIV. He provides hope for others through Jesus.  

What Anatas and I shared during this visit transcended all cultural and language barriers.  Our faith in God united us to be able to share our story as one family.  I concluded the home visit with a prayer. I prayed for his health and family. I prayed that he continue to be a shining beacon of hope for all others he comes across.  Last, I prayed that other loving families, like those of Anatas, would open their homes for the orphans of Rwanda and provide a safe haven for those who are neglected. Though this man came from humble beginnings, he had the heart and generosity of a king.  His story will forever remain in my heart.  

Since this visit, our team was fortunate to have been able to conduct many more.  I heard shocking testimonials of people whose lives have been transformed by God. We consoled and offered our support and encouragement to the homes of HIV survivors, adoptive parents, and orphans. I was able to share, laugh, and even cry with the people of Rwanda. This experience has opened my eyes to the power of faith and love. I no longer want to travel any other way.

 

If you would like to sponsor a family in Rwanda like this one, please visit www.saddleback.com/sponsorship

You can go to Rwanda and make an impact just like Tim. If you are interested in learning more about Orphan Care PEACE trips, please email orphans@saddleback.com.

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Today Senator Mary Landrieu and thirteen other Members of Congress introduced the Children in Families First Act of 2013 (CHIFF) into the Senate, with introduction into the House expected in a few weeks.

The introduction of this act is an exciting step forward for American international policy towards orphans, as CHIFF is built on the idea that American law should reflect the fact that children need families, and that institutional care is never an adequate substitute for the care of a family.

Around the world, millions of children are growing up without parental care, often sent to live in institutions. CHIFF aims to realign U.S. foreign assistance to prioritize children growing up in families. It will does this by focusing on protecting children by preserving, reunifying or creating families through kinship, domestic and international adoption; and strengthening procedures to prevent abuse of children without families, all without increasing spending. The goal of CHIFF is to make government smarter, not bigger, by redirecting resources that are currently not being well used in relation to foreign assistance for vulnerable children.

As part of its scope, to achieve these goals CHIFF would establish a bureau in the Department of State that will become the much-needed foreign policy and diplomatic hub on international child welfare. This new Bureau would be tasked with building international capacity to implement effective child welfare systems, with particular focus on family preservation and reunification, and kinship, domestic, and intercountry adoption. It also would streamline, simplify and consolidate responsibility for all processing of intercountry adoption cases by placing these functions under the direction of the United States Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS). 

Visit http://childreninfamiliesfirst.org to learn more about the Children in Families First Act of 2013, and to learn how you can contact your member of Congress to encourage them to support CHIFF.