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The Stinson family has been on a journey to chase after the things on God’s heart. Since early in their marriage, Christy and David recognized that caring for the orphan is a call and privilege given to every Christian. James 1:27 says, “Pure and genuine religion in the sight of God the Father is this....caring for orphans and widows in their distress” The Stinson's realized that becoming a disciple of Jesus is not just about learning, it's about obedience and daring to step out towards desires that God has has put within our hearts. As a result, advocating for orphaned children has become a hallmark of their life.

After having three wonderful biological children and navigating the challenges of a full house, an awareness and passion for vulnerable children pushed them out of their comfort zone towards children in need of a family. After they stepped out, imperfect and uncertain onto the waters towards Jesus in hopes of changing the world of a child through adoption, their world was also beautifully changed. After a journey filled with many ups and downs, they have grown from a family of five to a family of nine! 

After adopting four children, you might think that the Stinson family's passion to run towards orphaned children has wained. However, they have seen with their own eyes how much a family means to vulnerable, orphaned children, and they have tasted the indescribable treasures that come from drawing close to these precious ones so close to our Father's heart. Their next step of faith is introducing their church family at Saddleback San Diego to the call and the gift of Orphan Care Ministry. On Sunday, as lay leaders in the Orphan Care Initiative, they hosted an informative meeting about adoption and foster care. Their team began to reveal many of the diverse ways in which any believer can make a difference for orphans and vulnerable children locally and all over the world!

Recently a CBS 8 in San Diego featured the Stinson Family in a news story: 

CBS News 8 - San Diego, CA News Station - KFMB Channel 8

If you would like more information on adoption or foster care, or if you would like to serve with Orphan Care at the Saddleback San Diego campus, email us at orphans@saddleback.com or call the Orphan Care Initiative at 949-609-8555.

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If you’ve ever thought about adopting or fostering, you are not alone. Did you know that one out of four couples have considered adoption or foster care. No matter why you have considered it, there is a place where you can get accurate information, simple overviews, and your questions answered. During the month of November, Saddleback Church will be hosting an informational seminar called, Exploring Adoption and Foster Care for My Family, at six locations in Southern California....
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We prepared our hearts to serve during Miracles of Mercy campaign by setting aside a full day of prayer and fasting on Saturday, March 12, in the Lakeside Library at our Rancho Capistrano campus. We enjoyed a time of prayer, worship music, vision-casting, and fellowship from 7:00 AM to 8:00 PM. ...
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Saddleback's Orphan Care Initiative believes that church and family is God's solution to the orphan crisis. Raising a child who has come from a hard place is much more likely to find success inside the support of a church community. Orphan Care is committed to equipping a team of volunteers with training and infrastructure to help meet the unique needs of each adoptive family. There are five key areas that we will seek to help support the family. Each family will be assigned to a family coach (case manager) to help connect them to resources both in and outside the church.

1. Healthy Family: Healthy connected relationships in the family is the best way to prevent and correct behavioral issues. Orphan Care will connect adoptive families to free counselling and curriculum-based support groups that teach the TBRI principles.

2. Healthy Finances: Economic sustainability is a critical need of every family to thrive. Orphan Care will connect adoptive families to Saddleback Church’s Financial Freedom ministry and PEACE Center to help the family achieve economic sustainability.

3. Healthy Education: Access to education is a key component the development every child to prepare them for life. Orphan Care will develop and equip parents with tools to help them advocate on behalf of their child in the classroom. Many teachers would benefit from learning the needs of adoptive children so that they can effectively address behavioral issues.

4. Healthy Household: The demands of raising an adoptive child can cause a family to let the house go. Orphan Care will call on the Men’s Ministry for minor repairs and household maintenance. Additionally for large projects we’ll conduct serve-days to help make sure the housing meets the needs of the family.

5. Healthy Community: Community is the fabric of every society. Orphan Care seeks to fully plug a family into fellowship with church family and adoptive community. Life was never meant to be lived alone–difficulties get cut in half and joys get doubled in the community of friends.

If you know a family who needs help in any of these areas or would like to help families in these areas simply call the orphan care line at 949-609-8555 or email orphans@saddleback.com to learn more.


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Foster parents are in higher demand in Orange County after a new state law that took effect at the beginning of the year aims to place at-risk kids into permanent homes at a faster rate, said county officials. Orange County has until February 18 to come under compliance with this new law. This has placed a great need for licensed foster parents to not only provide homes for new foster children entering the system but also provide co-training for families seeking licensing. If you know someone who is a licensed foster parent in Orange County that is interested in helping the county train families by sharing firsthand experiences, please let us know by emailing orphans@saddleback.com.

Local orphan advocates at homes such as Orangewood Children and Family Center say the law also calls for major changes at group homes so that “children don’t spend years in what is referred to as ‘congregate’ or ‘residential’ care until they age out of the child welfare system at 18,” according to the Orange County Register.

“(The new law) increases our need for good foster homes exponentially,” said Elizabeth DenBleyker, public information officer for Orange County’s Social Services Agency. DenBleyker told the Register that 100 to 120 more such homes are needed.

Advocates favor the general goal of the new law. However, Orange County officials say “the new rules also present a challenge to find enough people – either relatives, other significant adults in a child’s life or foster parents – who can serve as what is being called ‘resource families’ for children whose biological parents are deemed unfit to raise them’,” the Register reports.

Read “Wanted: More Foster Parents in Orange County” beginning below.

Local advocates for children are scrambling to find more foster parents in Orange County, a result of a new state law aimed at placing abused kids into permanent homes faster. The law also figures to alter operations at the county’s best-known children’s home, Orangewood Children and Family Center.

The broader goal of AB403, which took effect Jan. 1, is to get traumatized youth into stable and supportive living situations, preferably in a family-like setting, as soon and as permanently as possible. It sets a limit of 10 days on the time a child can spend in a temporary emergency shelter such as Orangewood.

The law also calls for major changes at group homes so that children don’t spend years in what is referred to as “congregate” or “residential” care until they age out of the child welfare system at 18. Group homes typically have six or more children housed together under the supervision of paid staff.

“(The new law) increases our need for good foster homes exponentially,” said Elizabeth DenBleyker, public information officer for Orange County’s Social Services Agency. DenBleyker pegged the need at 100 to 120 more such homes.

The county has about 400 licensed resource family homes, but only about one-third are prepared and ready to take in children, DenBleyker said.

Currently, 2,304 children are in county dependency, with most of them placed with relatives or other adults in their lives in family-based settings… FULL STORY

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